Aaron's Directory (part 2)

EPOXY HELP

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Aaron's   epoxy resin table

 

 

Directory of Commercial Two Part

Epoxy Paint Coating Web Sites

  Visit our companion site Index of Epoxy Information

 

stitch and glue marine epoxy

 

 PRIMARY STORE LINK --- TOP SELLING PRODUCTS --- EPOXY GURU HELP SITE --- ALUTHANE MCU PAINT --- BASIC NO BLUSH (MARINE AND STONE EPOXY) --- BUY NO BLUSH

You won't learn if you don't ask! We share information 24/7 and earn your business!

HOT SPOTS: shippingContainers swimPool bartops cellarLeaks dataSheet
barrierCoats pebbleDeck floors boats rot HELP/INDEX

 

Epoxy Only Web Google Search

 

 

#1) Google Everything Epoxy Searches

#2) Google Marine Epoxies Searches

#3)Google Floor Epoxy Searches
 

 View our Progressive Epoxy Products, Inc.

company video

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Epoxy coatings, adhesives and sealers cover a wide range of products, applications and prices. Most epoxies are used in industrial or marine setting where their toughness and chemical resistance give them superior performance over other coatings. Some epoxies can even be applied by brush or roller underwater.

Welcome to Aaron's Directory of Epoxy Web Sites. This is the place to begin your education, training, or product search within the exciting world of epoxies.

If you are new to epoxies click here to become an instant expert
EPOXY PRIMER.


Looking for a non-epoxy concrete sealer or waterproofer - also perfect under your epoxy coating??? visit http://www.epoxyproducts.com/vee4u.html


Reasons for coating failures

Preparation problem 70%; application problem 12%; environment problem 6%; wrong paint selection 9%; bad paint 1%; adding thinner 2%


How to evaluate your epoxy / epoxy vendor - CLICK HERE


Industry quote: "There are only a handful of different epoxy bases, a handful or two of hardening agents, and a handful of solvents, fillers, and solvent-free extenders used to formulate epoxy products. Epoxies are not cheap to manufacture and $25, $35, $45 epoxies represent the trash end of the product line where price is the only purchasing criteria."

How Thick? How thick should your coating be? Economics play a major role in determining how much coating to apply. One U.S. gallon contains 231 cubic inches. That's only 1.6 cubic square feet of surface at one inch thick and that's also assuming a solvent-free product. If the product is 25% VOC (i.e. 25% solvent) then dry thickness/coverage will be 25% less. Again, assuming a 1/4 inch thick coating (250 mils) maximum coverage will still be only 6.4 square feet per gallon. A solvent-free (100% solids) epoxy coating applied at 16 mils will cover 100 square feet per gallon (note: the wall paint in your office is probably 2-4 mils). While thick coatings sound like a good idea, they use so much product that they must be made very cheaply so that coating 1,000 or 10,000 square feet can still be done at a competitive price. A high quality, fairly expensive product with a coverage rate of 100 sq. feet or more per gallon, on the other hand, will have a low enough cost per sq. foot to provide both economy and top quality.


Additional pages on epoxy floor paint coatings:


http://www.concrete-garage-epoxy-floor-paint.com/epoxy-floor-paint.html ----- Index of Epoxy Floor Paint Sites - Basics, Options,

Comparisons, Problems, Issues (click here)



http://www.concrete-garage-epoxy-floor-paint.com/epoxy_floor_paint_test.html ---- Garage Epoxy Floor Paint --- Self Test ---

10 questions you need to know/ask regarding epoxy floor paint coating (click here)


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HELP Page

Progressive Epoxy Polymers, Inc.

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DIY/INDUST

NAVIGATION

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CATEGORY

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Epoxy Floor Links Page ====>

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Marine - Boat Related Links Page ====>

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Epoxy Repair Related Links Page ====>

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Learn About Epoxies Links ====>

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Bar Top - Table Top Clear Epoxy ====>

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TOP SELLING PRODUCTS


We are also very involved with Epoxy/Coatings in the following areas:

-- -Marine/Boat Repair/Building- -- -Pour On Bar top Epoxy- -- Epoxy Floor Paints (massive info/options)- -- -Home/Commercial Epoxy Paints/Putties- -- -Pebble Deck Recoat Epoxy- -- -Epoxy Education- -- -Underwater Epoxy Painting/Repair- -- -EpoxyProducts Home Page- -- EpoxyUSA Home Page- -- -Ask Professor E.Poxy- --

 


Contents:

DISCOUNT/SALE/CLEARANCE EPOXIES - CLICK HERE


Master Link Site of epoxy info and products Click Here

 

 MARINE SITES

 
 Progressive Epoxy Polymers Marine Page epoxies and supplies for boat builders

marine epoxy sold here

CLICK HERE

 
hull blister repair information

 CLICK HERE

 
 fiberglass hull barrier
coat epoxy info.

 CLICK HERE

 
Epoxies for waste water applications

CLICK HERE

 
 Price comparisons between the major marine epoxy brands

 CLICK HERE

 
Info on Amine (epoxy) Blush

CLICK HERE

 
     
 

 VENDOR SITES

 
 Shell Chemical (resins)

 CLICK HERE

 
 Multi-Seal (epoxies for the electronic industry)

 CLICK HERE

 
 Progressive Epoxy Polymers (Kevlar® reinforced, surface tolerant, primerless, solvent free epoxies - waste water, chemical plants, etc.) Most diverse source of multi-vendor epoxies on the internet.

 CLICK HERE

 
 P.P.I. epoxies for waterjetted surfaces

 CLICK HERE

 
 hi-temp epoxies, Teflon epoxies, flexibilized epoxies

 CLICK HERE

 
Approved wet and dry surface epoxies for the nuclear industry

 CLICK HERE

 
Viton caulking for high end expansion joint sealing (Thermodyn Corp. - Cary Kaufman)

CLICK HERE

 
Plural Component Epoxy Spray Units (SprayQuip - Frank Matthews)

CLICK HERE

 
 

 INFORMATIVE ARTICLES

 
 ARTICLE: How to Have A Successful Epoxy Coating Job ARTICLE: How & Why To Epoxy Paint Your Concrete Slab  ARTICLE: Layman's Guide to Epoxy Coating Failures 
 ARTICLE: The Great Epoxy Barrier Coat Rip-Off ARTICLE: Sealing Basements and Concrete Pits  ARTICLE: Eight Ways to Reduce Pin Holing When Coating Concrete 
  ARTICLE: A Few Words About Underwater Epoxy Coatings  ARTICLE: Epoxy Issues in Manhole Rehab Projects ARTICLE: Epoxy Coating Notes for Home Owners (surface preparation, etc.) 
     
 

 CASE STUDIES

 
     
 

 EPOXY WARNINGS

 
 Danger of MDA in underwater epoxies

 CLICK HERE

 
 Beware of Nonyl Phenol in your epoxy

 CLICK HERE

 
     
 

 EPOXY FLOORING

 
 Information and how-to on epoxy floors ($0.40 - $3.50 per square foot - many options)

 CLICK HERE

 
Understanding Vapor Transmission Issues When Coating Concrete

CLICK HERE

 
3-rd party site on concrete floor surface preparation

CLICK HERE

 
 

 

 
     
 

PIPE REPAIR

 
 Epoxy pipe repair and pipe repair kits

 CLICK HERE

 
     
 

TESTING LABS

 
 

 

 
     
 

EPOXIES FOR ELECTRONICS

 
      
 

  TRADE ASSOCIATIONS

 
 SSPC - Society for Protective Coatings

 CLICK HERE

 
 British Coating Federation

 CLICK HERE

 
 NPCA - National Paint and Coatings Association

 CLICK HERE

 
     
 

HELP SECTION

 
Ask Professor E.Poxy

CLICK HERE

 
 Chemistry of Epoxy

 CLICK HERE

 
 Intro to Coal Tar Epoxies

CLICK HERE 

 
Repairing Epoxy/Stone Decks

CLICK HERE

 
 Novolac/Hi Temp Epoxy Info

 CLICK HERE

 
     
 

 MISC. STUFF

 
 The Epoxy Outlet Store

 CHICK HERE

 
 Chemistry of epoxies - novolac/urethanes

 CLICK HERE

 
Bio Vee (non-epoxy) concrete fortifier and sealer - new technology

CLICK HERE

 
     






Epoxy Coating Primer

There is a lot of confusion regarding epoxy products. How does one epoxy compare to another? What is a good price for epoxy? How can I spot quality products and avoid low end epoxies that may not work in my application? Welcome to EPOXY 101 - your introduction into epoxy coatings. We'll stick to general characteristics and rules of thumb. Keep in mind there are always exceptions and what might be viewed as an advantage in one situation can be a problem in another. Facts always give way to opinion, mine or yours, and everything, particularly general information, will inevitably be slightly clouded by personal opinions. Warnings aside, let's get started.

PRICE: Epoxy coating prices are all over the board, from a few dollars per gallon, to hundreds of dollars per gallon. Keep in mind that epoxies are expensive to make and that all businesses must have large mark-ups over the manufacturing costs just to stay in business. I worry about epoxies coatings that sell for under about $70-75 dollars per gallon as well as those that sell for over about $300 per gallon. There are many additives and fillers that can be mixed into epoxies to significantly lower their price. These watered-down epoxies no longer have all the favorable characteristics (i.e. chemical properties) associated with undiluted epoxies. On the high end of price, even allowing for large distribution, advertising, commissions, overhead, etc. it is still pretty difficult to justify a non-imported price of more than a few hundred dollars per gallon. More useful than cost per gallon is cost per finished square foot. Even that has serious problems because of extreme differences in the thickness of the coating applied. Some coatings are literally applied 200 times thicker than other coatings. Some coatings will provide several hundred square feet of coverage per gallon (at very thin thicknesses), will other trowellable coatings will only get several square feet per gallon. Applying a coating at 1/4 inch thick requires 1 gallon of product for every 6.4 square feet.

COATING THICKNESS: Which is better, a thick coat or a thin coat? Of course there is no right or wrong answer here, but we can make a few observations. The decorative one coat wall paint inside your house is probably 2-4 mils thick (1 mil equals 1/1000 of an inch). For industrial or commercial use most people would prefer a thicker coating for more protection. A reasonable number might be 8-50 mils thickness, perhaps even 100 mils in a tough marine setting (remember that 1/4 inch is equal to 250 mils). Some epoxy coatings are applied in thick amounts by trowel. A thick floor coating, for example, may initially sound like a good idea, but knowing that such products only get a few square feet of coverage per gallon it becomes obvious that in order to make such products affordable for any decent sized project, the cost per gallon must be extremely low. That requires cutting a lot of corners to get the price down. Thus, a thick epoxy floor will often be inferior to a much thinner epoxy floor in terms of its chemical and mechanical properties.

SOLVENTS: More and more coatings, including epoxy coatings, are now solvent free, also known as 100% solids (or 0% VOC). What is nice about solvent-free epoxies is that if you apply 1 gallon of solvent free epoxy to 100 square feet of surface. The coating will not shrink as it cures. It will go on at 16 mils thick and harden at 16 mils. A similar product containing 50% solvent (will go on at 16 mils, but then lose half of its volume as the solvent evaporates, leaving behind only 8 mils of coating. Voids and cracks filled with the wet epoxy might not be filled or sealed when half the product evaporates. Solvent based coatings are also unhealthy to breathe, especially in confined spaces. They also tend to burn easily and ‘skin' over in partially used cans - often resulting in having to dispose of unused open product. Solvents are one way to thin a epoxy to lower cost. There are also solvent-free thinners that will do the same thing.

EPOXY RESINS AND CURING AGENTS: All two part epoxies consist of an epoxy base and an epoxy curing agent that reacts with the base resin and produces a hardened, inert product. Special additives are often included to provide special properties and to thicken or thin the epoxy. Sometimes additives are also used to simply lower the cost. Epoxy formulators can select from several different epoxy base and curing agent chemicals. As a very rough rule of thumb, epoxies formulated with less expensive (less high performance) chemicals tend to have the following characteristics:

* The epoxy resin tends to crystallize over time

* Induction time - after mixing the epoxy and curing agent, they must sit and ‘cook' several minutes before applying them

* Amine blush forms - in humid conditions the hardened epoxy has a waxy layer formed on it

* The curing agent requires special haz-mat shipping

* Being off even just a tiny bit on the mix ratio means the epoxy will not harden

EPOXY CHEMISTRY: There are three basic types of resin: Bis-A, Bis-F, and Novolac (TM). Most epoxies are made from Bis-A resins. These resins will, unless diluted or altered, typically handle 70% Sulphuric Acid and temperatures of 150-200 degrees F. Novolac resins will handle 98% sulphuric acid and temperatures of 400-500 F. Bis-F resins fall between the two.

Structurally most epoxies are formed from straight molecular chains. Higher quality epoxies use ring shape molecules (cyclo-aliphatic polyamines). While all epoxies are brittle, (2-3% elongation), the ring epoxies generally have an elongation of 7-9%. Special additives can increase epoxy elasticity significantly, but the trade-off is a decrease in other chemical properties.

EPOXY SHORTCOMINGS: The time a person can work with a two-part epoxy before it begins to harden is called pot life. The time it takes to harden is called cure time. Most end users want a long pot life but a short cure time. Unfortunately this is hard to achieve. It is easy to shorten both pot life and cure time using certain chemicals, but slowing down the reaction isn't so easy. One way to change working times is with temperature. An 18 degree F change in temperature will either half or double the pot life. It will also greatly affect the thickness of the epoxy. Increasing the temperature decreases the viscosity of the epoxy noticeably.

Epoxies also tend to yellow and chalk in sunlight. Under UV light white epoxy will generally turn a straw color. Some epoxies are more UV resistant, and less yellowing, than others. Generally epoxies used for durability outside are top coated with other paints or enamels that don't yellow and retain their gloss.

NEAT EPOXY FLAVORS: What's new, or at least exciting with epoxies? There are water-based epoxies and epoxies that go on underwater. Protective epoxy coatings may contain Kevlar (TM) or Teflon (TM). There are even lead enhanced epoxies used around radioactive sources.

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Epoxy Only Web Google Search

 

 

#1) Google Everything Epoxy Searches

#2) Google Marine Epoxies Searches

#3)Google Floor Epoxy Searches
 

 View our Progressive Epoxy Products, Inc.

company video

Contact Page



WOW!  35% - 40% of all daily online or telephone orders are from existing  customers. That's an amazing 'REPEAT CUSTOMER" number.

EPOXY-ONLY WEB SEARCH

603 - 435 - 7199 ANYTIME 24/7 FOR HELP OR ORDERS

 


Progressive Epoxy Polymers, Inc.

www.epoxyproducts.com

 

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clear marine epoxy

Basic No Blush ™

#1 rated, formulated, clear marine epoxy. Sold to the public at distributor prices.
--Click Here-- .

Aaron's Directory - All things two part Epoxy - Epoxy Help
page 2 - industrial epoxy paint and resin related products Web sites - Help pages - epoxy
 

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